Tag Archives: ISO standards

Quality preschool furniture from us to you

Good preschool furniture companies like Kinder Design strive to bring customers the best product possible. The only interest the less savoury providers have is making more money before the quarter is over. So that our customers get the best, we follow rules and guidelines so that we’re at our best.

The International Standards Organisation (ISO) creates the standards that companies, their products, and even their people need to follow. The organisation has more than 700 representative bodies from over 150 countries. One way to interpret this is quality assurance, worldwide. In the news, you’ve seen what happens when profit is more important than quality control. Buildings crumble, organisations get bad ratings, and there’s horror stories of toxic culture. Worse, toxic products that cause major health concerns flood the market.

To combat this and make sure that standards are upheld industry wide, the ISO created one for ecological measures. ISO 14001 exists, in its own words:

To provide organizations with a framework to protect the environment and respond to changing environmental conditions in balance with socio-economic needs.

(ISO 14001:2015)

More comprehensive information is found in the guide itself, from company and workplace context to measure expectations all the way through to how to contact the ISO for support.

Creating and selling quality products like preschool furniture doesn’t stop at the environment. ISO Guide 9001:

…helps ensure that customers get consistent, good quality products and services, which in turn brings many business benefits.

(ISO 9001:2015)

This set of guidelines is intended to improve the workings of a company internally, from top tier-managers to entry-level workers and trainees. This way the business operates efficiently and provides the best customer service it can. It even gives the business the potential to expand into new markets and organisations. It’s up to the management to figure out how the business can improve, but if they follow the 9001 guide results should follow.

How do these results show themselves? All of the guidelines follow the plan, do, check, act cycle (PDCA). The upper-tier of the business has to be willing to conduct some in-depth company auditing and take risks. After a specified period of time (6 months, one year, etc.) they review performance and look for ways to improve. The cycle then repeats itself.

In the guidelines preview, the disclaimer says the ISO doesn’t exist to increase any business’ legal standing in how it conducts its work or affect its production. ISO 14001 is in place to give planet-conscious companies a guide to improve their practices and product. ISO 9001 makes those who follow it take a good look at themselves, how they conduct business and if they truly are giving the best to their customers. This can be anything from preschool furniture to responding to customer enquries.