Setting up a daycare

Daycares are a place of fun, learning and trust. Parents trust the teachers to care for their children, who learn and have fun at the same time. Setting up a daycare effectively requires a bit of planning and coordination.

Fun

According to psychologists and as written in the Early Years Learning Framework, children learn from their surrounds. When they’re learning and having fun at once, they’re learning passively. The kids will learn certain skills, build on them and use them in their lives to come.

A daycare centre needs a fun “play time” area that’s equipped to deal with little ones. Cubby houses are widespread and companies build them around certain themes. The options are endless but common cubby house designs include corner shops, kitchens and miniature houses. For the kids who want to “play house” but didn’t get to the cubby in time, some daycare centres stock large, soft building blocks. The children stack these as they like whether a house, a fence or a simple line of soft blocks they can use for gymnastics.

Learning

Daycare is fun and games for the most part. But there comes a time when the kids must sit and do some structured activity.

A dedicated area with desks and chairs is found in any daycare centre. Large tables are used to encourage kids to work together and develop a sense of “belonging” in a group. The furniture is low-set to match the size of the children. They’re made with wood, plastic or both and day-cares can order them in colours for something different.

Other items to add to the “learning” aspect of a daycare is a space to read. Children can read books with their teachers, by themselves at a desk or in a “quiet area” with some soft furniture (cushions) and a book caddy.

Rest

Kids have fun, learn a lot and then sleep before they do it all over again. Day care centres have room for short sleeps in their schedules so that their charges can rest and recharge. Daycare furniture suppliers do have small bed frames available. A common option, though, is to lay out mattresses on the floor.

Daycare furniture that children use everyday

You’ll find “essential” daycare furniture like tables and chairs in every centre you visit. There’s also areas for the children to play and rest. Other pieces of furniture mightn’t seem so important but they’re definitely something the children will play with and use constructively every day.

Easels
Easels can come with whiteboard backing, magnetic backing or just as a wood frame with space to hold a canvas. Children use these to make works of art that get hung around the classroom or taken home to show off to parents.

It’s healthy for kids to have a traditional creative outlet; they enjoy music, drama and active play. Normally they draw at a desk. But as a fun change getting some easels, a few paint pallets and lots of brushes encourages them to unleash their inner Picasso.

Building blocks
For the builder or architect within. Building blocks are made and sold in large packs but there’s a multitude of options. Many daycares will have the traditional models made of wooden. Large, soft foam blocks, though, double as furniture. Large rectangular blocks can act as seats used in group activities or when children just want to sit together.

Daycare furniture suppliers make the foam blocks in a range of colours to keep the item “playful” like the centre they’re going to. They also come in various shapes. It’s common for kids to make forts and houses out of the blocks.

Cubby houses
Kids copy what they see, and cubby houses give them an environment to act it out. Whether it’s an episode of their favourite reality cooking show or cartoon, there’s an option available to suit. Some daycare furniture suppliers can make cubbies to order.

Cubbies get used every day because they so much fun to begin with. The children play house, or firemen or whatever other scenario the cubby allows. When cubbies are occupied, another option is for the children to use the foam blocks to make a house instead.